Editorials: An accumlation

I’m an editorial fiend, an absolute junkie for a slick layout and some stellar styling. I pore through all fashion spreads in every magazine I can, dropping everything I’m doing at that moment in time. The same goes for that time of day when Fashion Gone Rogue’s newsletter lands in my inbox (it goes without saying that I am more than happy FGR has been able to continue – as well as editorial content, it has also introduced me to some of my favourite indie magazines and independent publications). As do most people at some stage, I sometimes think that I’m stuck in a style ‘rut’ as regards content; in that I cling to the same type of styling over and over. For the most part, masculine tailoring with lashings of statement gold jewellery is guaranteed to make me salivate. However, in this instance, I think I’ve picked a pretty random, albeit fabulous, selection. Can anybody spot a theme? Which editorial is your favourite?

// All images are linked //

Fashion illustrations: What about them?

Editorials, photo shoots and campaigns are so widespread these days, there’s an undeniable level of saturation; fashion illustrations are a fantastic way of challenging this. Fashion illustrations render a link between the finished piece and that which is merely a drawing, for don’t all designer creations start out as sketches? Dignified and understated, Teri Chung’s illustrations capture the flow and vitality of designs from Jil Sander, Comme des Garcons and Balenciaga as does any photographer worth their salt. Something I’m looking to focus on more, is fashion illustration an untapped market? Or have I just been ignorant to it thus far? Overlooked by the mainstream media for the most part (I feel!), indie publications such as i-D and fashion photographer Rankin’s The Hunger magazine make great use of fashion illustrations, some of which I will post here for you all soon.

“Wear it in and wear it out”

From the man who gave us skin-tight lycra and Kiss-inspired make up in ‘Let Me Entertain You’, Robbie Williams has moved on to menswear, cultivating a label and burgeoning brand that represents the new Robbie most perfectly (having undergone his miraculous life change over the past few years – a combination of maturity, ambition and the love of a good woman). Accompanied by his Head of Design, Ben Dickens, formerly of Burberry, both have laid a solid foundation with their collection of high-end classic menswear with a twist, in what I hope is a successful endeavour for Mr Williams. It goes without saying that I’m usually dubious of artists-turned-designers. It’s early days yet but so far, Robbie carries off his new role with aplomb, initiative and his quintessential cheek, with his influence abundantly clear in their AW12 campaign. To shop Farrell or for more on the brand, including the origins of the label’s motto – “Wear it in and wear it out” – click here.

Dressing for fashion week

I consciously abstained from posting about fashion week and all its goings-ons. In saying that, now that the dust has settled on the SS13 shows, there is one observation to be made from the whole thing. Fashion Week, no matter the city, just sends ‘fashion’ people into absolute overdrive! Into a colossal tailspin whereby outfits are planned months in advance (!) and the main objective, judging by street style blogs and such, is to feature on said street style blogs. As is obvious, to feature on a street style blog is not the main objective of fashion week, however nice a perk it may be.

Think of fashion week as the opportunity to go all out, but in your (“your” addressing people who are actually lucky enough to make their way to fashion week) own way, in a manner that is not so clearly choreographed and attuned to the preferred stylings of certain street style photographers.

For example, Bryan Boy at NYFW feigning nonchalance and/or ignoring the lens pointed in his general direction – impractical, not to mention kinda ugly, this futuristic Alexander McQueen visor just adds to the Bryan-Boy-blogger-cliché. And my beloved Miroslava Duma, who generally gets it SO right – see here – falls prey to the vices of Fashion Week dressing too. And as to street style for Fashion Week in general, as Rosemary Mac Cabe of Fash Mob so eloquently put it, “Is it time to rename ‘street style’? My suggestion: ‘Thin people looking photogenic in expensive clothes'”.

//Stockholm Streetstyle // Jak & Jill // Le 21eme //

Back to life

Words cannot do justice to how much I love this November spread from Vogue Paris, featuring Doutzen Kroes modelling looks styled by grand dame of the French fashion Bible herself, Emmanuelle Alt. Renowned for her sex kitten looks – Doutzen did start out as a Maybelline girl, fluttering her eyelashes and simpering for the cameras, afterall – her high-fashion prowess executes perfectly looks that are a stellar combination of some Boy George, a hefty dose of Madonna and a touch of Michael Jackson. Looking at this editorial, I imagine Soul II Soul’s ‘Back to Life‘ playing away in the background as Doutzen breaks it down eighties style on the beach. Not exactly what you would call high-fashion, but the shots are absolutely smouldering, which is in no doubt thanks to AW12 touches such as the Louis Vuitton-inspired layering of tunics over tapered pants, and sheer masculine tailoring, achieved with a classic white shirt, braces and high-waisted pants.

//Fashion Gone Rogue //